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Acquisition of Taiwanese, L1

(2,667 words)

Author(s): Jane TSAY
1. Introduction Taiwanese refers to the Southern Mǐn variety of Chinese spoken in Táiwān, as the term has been used in the literature (e.g., Cheng 1968). According to Huáng Xuānfàn (1993), about 73% of the population in Táiwān belongs to the Southern Mǐn ethnic group. However, for over forty years (1950s-1990s), Mandarin was the only official language for instruction in schools in Táiwān. Taiwanese was even prohibited outside class on school grounds up to the 1970s, or even later. One of the c…
Date: 2017-03-02

Acquisition of Tone, L1

(3,951 words)

Author(s): Jane TSAY
1. Theme and Methods All varieties of Chinese have lexical tones. The most discussed issues concerning the acquisition of tone in Sinitic (Chinese) languages include: 1. The acquisition of tones versus the acquisition of segmentals; 2. The chronological order (or stages) in the acquisition of tone categories (i.e., lexically contrastive tone); 3. The substitution of tones or deviations from the adult form; and 4. The acquisition of tone rules. In addition to the above issues, less discussed, but by no means less important, issues will also be brought to the reade…
Date: 2017-03-02

Sign Languages, Táiwān

(3,263 words)

Author(s): James H.Y. TAI | Jane TSAY
1. History Taiwan Sign Language (TSL) is a natural language developed and used by the deaf in Táiwān. According to the 2013 report of the Ministry of the Interior, Táiwān, there are about 13,396 citizens with hearing mechanism disability in Táiwān (http://www.moi.gov.tw/stat/year.aspx/). Smith (2005) reported that TSL is used by approximately 30,000 deaf people residing in Táiwān. However, as yet there is no official census of the population of TSL signers. There are two types of sociolinguistic circumstances for the emergence of a natural sign language (Meir et al. 2010): village …
Date: 2017-03-02