Sacramentum Mundi Online

Get access Subject: Religious Studies

Edited by: Karl Rahner with Cornelius Ernst and Kevin Smyth.
Advisor for the online edition: Karen Kilby, Durham University

Sacramentum Mundi Online is the online edition of the famous six volume English reference work in Catholic Theology, edited (in 1968-1970) by Karl Rahner, one of the main Catholic theologians of the 20th century. Sacramentum Mundi: An Encyclopedia of Theology was originally published by Herder Verlag, and is now available online at Brill.

For more information: Brill.com

Ecumenism - Movements for Church Union

(3,176 words)

Author(s): Victor Conzemius
Part of Ecumenism: 1. Ecumenical Movement 2. Movements for Church Union 3. Catholic Ecumenism 4. Ecumenical Theology 5. Christian-Jewish Dialogue 6. Christian Denominations A. Origins Ever since apostolic times the visible unity of the Church of Christ has been endangered and sometimes obscured by schism, heresy and division. The recovery of unity is, however, required of the Church not simply for the sake of a more convincing attestation of its missionary calling but by an explicit command of Christ himself (Jn 17). Ev…

Education - Basic Education

(4,063 words)

Author(s): Max Müller
Part of Education: 1. Basic Education 2. Philosophy of Education 3. Pedagogy 4. Religious Education 5. Self-Education 1. Concept. Formation or basic education is the process by which man acquires the true form of his being as man. The end-product is sometimes known as his culture (the static rather than the dynamic concept of formation). Man is properly such through his “purposefulness”, that is, his basic openness and orientation towards a fulfilment which lies before him. He is not “ready-made” like inorganic t…

Education - Pedagogy

(2,435 words)

Author(s): John W. Donohue
Part of Education: 1. Basic Education 2. Philosophy of Education 3. Pedagogy 4. Religious Education 5. Self-Education Pedagogy may be variously defined. The term can be understood to mean formal teaching itself and this signification can then be widened to include the history of change and progress in methods and theories of instruction over the course of centuries and from one culture to another. Pedagogy may also denote both the systematization of general and specific principles governing effective teaching an…

Education - Philosophy of Education

(2,395 words)

Author(s): Reinhold Mühlbauer
Part of Education: 1. Basic Education 2. Philosophy of Education 3. Pedagogy 4. Religious Education 5. Self-Education 1. The implications of the word “educate”. To educate is generally taken to mean “to lead or draw out”, from the Latin e-ducare. Other more or less equivalent words in English are to rear (i.e., to raise) and to bring up. In all cases the notion of education suggests the following elements: a) the possibility of a change in the child; b) a certain direction and purpose in the up- bringing; c) the influence of the educ…

Education - Religious Education

(1,787 words)

Author(s): Leopold Lentner
Part of Education: 1. Basic Education 2. Philosophy of Education 3. Pedagogy 4. Religious Education 5. Self-Education 1. The notion of religious education is to be seen against the background of the Enlightenment. It is the scientific analysis of the means and methods to be used in religious and moral upbringing. In the ОТ, the bonds by which the Israelites were united to Yahweh, strengthened by their constant confrontation with the history of salvation in the liturgy, held good for all stages of men’s, life. But in …

Education - Self-Education

(934 words)

Author(s): Heinrich Beck
Part of Education: 1. Basic Education 2. Philosophy of Education 3. Pedagogy 4. Religious Education 5. Self-Education 1. Nature, purpose and aims of self-education. Unlike what we may term “other-directed” education in which the person who educates (“the educator”) and the person who is being educated (the “pupil”) are distinct and separate, in self-education the two are identical. Man is at once his own educator and pupil since as educator he “brings up” himself (as pupil) to his higher and true self. Thus we discover as a basis for the possibility of self-education a certain non-id…
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